Prize Recipient


Deep Jariwala

Deep Jariwala
Northwestern University

Citation:

"For insightful work in the processing, properties and applications of heterostructure devices from low-dimensional materials"

Background:

Deep Jariwala, Ph.D., completed his undergraduate degree in metallurgical engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology (Delhi) in 2010. During his time as an undergraduate summer researcher, Dr. Jariwala contributed to the early pioneering works on chemical vapor deposition of graphene, boron nitride, and their heterostructures, in the laboratory of Pulickel Ajayan, Ph.D., at Rice University (Houston, Texas). In 2015, Dr. Jariwala completed his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering at Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.) under the supervision of Mark Hersam, Ph.D. and Tobin Marks, Ph.D.. At Northwestern, Dr. Jariwala made important contributions to the study of charge transport and electronic applications of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors and pioneering the study of gate-tunable, mixed-dimensional, van der Waals heterostructures. His Ph.D. work also includes one of the first demonstrations of band-like transport in a 2D semiconductor and a gate-tunable p-n heterojunction diode comprising atomically thin materials.  Dr. Jariwala earned the highest graduate student level awards from multiple professional societies, including the the American Vacuum Society’s Russell and Sigurd Varian Award, the Materials Research Society’s Graduate Student Award, the International Society for Optics and Photonics Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship, as well as Northwestern’s highest department level honor, the Johannes E. and Julia R. Weertman Doctoral Fellowship. Since September 2015, Dr. Jariwala has been working as a Resnick Prize Postdoctoral Fellow in applied physics and materials science at the California Institute of Technology (Pasadena) with Harry Atwater, Ph.D. Dr. Jariwala is currently investigating strategies for enhancing light-matter interactions in 2D materials for efficient, ultra-thin, opto-electronic devices.